Music

OPINION: Watch The Throne or Musical Chairs? A Song By Song Breakdown #WTT

by cminaya

The royal road to Watch the Throne was paved by the driving forces of two hip-hop gods that left the mob of mortal rappers striving to be rap kings double-parked at a dead end street. It is not difficult to clutch at the transcendence of the album, yet to put the brakes on why Jay-Z and Kanye West completed and released it is. Their legacies are immutable, so only they know why. What I think is that the album consists of a game of musical chairs, and Hova sat more.

After Frank Ocean’s sterling chorus for the opening track “No Church In the Wild” inaugurates the pièce de résistance, Jay founds the first verse. Not to be outdone, Kanye trounces with some resplendent bars, such as, “No sins, as long as there’s permission,” and “Coke on her black skin make a stripe like a zebra. I call that jungle fever.” Winner: ‘Ye

The record’s most mellifluous song, “Lift Off,” includes: a feature from the glamorous Beyonce, production by Kanye, Pharrell and Q-Tip, mixing and additional programming by LMFAO, additional vocals by Seal and Mr Hudson and the helping hand of the talented Bruno Mars. For all that, Jay evened the rounds at one a piece, with one bar; “When you Earnhardt as me, eventually you hit a big wall.” Winner: Hova

Facts decided the winner of the next round, “N—-as In Paris.” At first, one will feel that it is on a par, yet, after listening to it again, the edge has to be given to Hova since what he rapped has documented verity. Winner: Hova

The Brooklyn native asserted, “The Nets could go 0-82 and I look at you like this sh– gravy,” which is true seeing as, according to Forbes, he is 2011’s top earner in hip-hop. To boot, he voiced, “Le Meurice for like six days,” the place in France where they, in actuality, recorded the track. 

As mentioned in my single review of “Otis,” Mr. Carter’s bars eclipsed Kanye’s, giving him a 3-1 lead. Winner: Hova

With “Gotta Have It,” Kanye did not stand a chance. The Neptunes produced it, and most, if not all, know what Jay does to tracks produced by them. Winner: Hova

On the masterpiece’s most moving record, “New Day,” Kanye gains ground on Jay, since Hova seemed to model his verse, a bit, on Yeezy’s verse; I doubt Jay would say “Me and the RZA connect” to start a verse, on his own. Winner: ‘Ye

“That’s My B—-” was unfair to Kanye. Jay has Beyonce at his side courtside, and raps about her; he won. Winner: Hova

Envisioning the tracks as rounds of boxing rather than musical chairs, at this point of the album, Yeezy would have been woozy with Jay just routing every song, and “Welcome to the Jungle” was the round he suffered the deciding knockout. A track produced exclusively by Swizz Beatz? Kanye should have thrown in the towel. Winner: Hova

Having released Watch the Throne on 08.08.11 as a worldwide exclusive, only on iTunes, it is somewhat eerie that by the eighth track it is evident who put whom in the shade. Irrespective of whether the notion of a lyrical game of musical chairs is true or not, the chairs these sit in are thrones, appropriately. We are lucky enough to watch. Then again, “What’s a mob to a king?”