Reviews

Review: MF Doom – Unexpected Guests

by Winston "Stone" Ford

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MF Doom is a tortured soul. The Masked Black Man created the Doom persona out of the ashes of the failed KMD hip-hop group back in the day, and he has grown to become somewhat of a legend in the underground hip-hop community. Even though Doom has damaged his brand by duping paying fans with lip-syncing impostors (from which he says is a part of the plan–“If I was to go out there without the mask on, they’d be like, ‘Who the fuck is this?’ I might send a white dude next … I’ll send a Chinese nigger. I’ll send ten Chinese niggers. I might send the Blue Man Group.”) there is still a demand for Dumile to drop another album.

However, the long awaited followup to 2004’s Mmm…Food and 2005’s The Mouse And The Mask still seems to be on hold. There hasn’t been a peep from Doom’s camp about a possible release and his fans aren’t holding their breath to see it reach the light of da. Even though Doom claims to be in the studio, constant delays, and the lack of information has almost forced fans to give up.

At least there is Unexpected Guests to hold us over.

Unexpected Guests throws together an impressive amount Doom rarities, including KMD’s “Sorcerers,” “ Quite Buttery” with Count Bass D, and other collaborations with Masta Killa, Talib, Gza, including one offs like “One More Ale,” 12 inch rarities like “My Favorite Ladies,” as well as the previously unreleased Dilla collabo “Sniper Elite.” Instead of the thrown together sound of similar projects, Unexpected Guests is sequenced in such a way that it sounds like a cohesive and complete album.

Until Doom gets his act together and drops a proper followup project, Unexpected Guest will serve as a fitting substitute. Gold Dust is known for somehow finding the rarest tracks possible for their compilations, and this time they dug deep, finding cuts that I’m sure Mr. Dumille himself didn’t know he had. For the Doom fan, this is a must have. For the casual listener, its a portal into the world of rap’s most complicated mind. Buy this album today.