by Rome

Question is….how exactly do you go about finding information regarding “the cool sh-t”? When I say “the cool sh-t” I refer to parties, art events, and music that no one knows about. Is it blogs, email lists, word of mouth? I ask because I have a dope Halloween party coming up, 3 mixes/mixtapes, and 3 opporutinites to start new parties in DC. Holla@ the comments people, good lookin.

p.s. Why is it that they don’t play dance music @ black clubs?

  • Belve

    Cause black people don’t dance no mo. They just do like dis.. from side to side.

    I couldn’t help myself, but that is something I ave noticed. Dance music has become the domain non-black folks and by default so have dance clubs.

  • cam

    By “dance” do you mean techno, house, electro, etc.?

    Black people don’t feel that stuff. I guess black people used to feel house. But anybody under 30 doesn’t really seem to be into it. DC’s black club scene seems to be sort of an anomaly to me anyways. It’s dominated either by places that are too mainstream to really enjoy, or go go. And people do dance at the go go’s.

    You should check out some hole in the wall places in the south. The trend has been that it bubbles there for about a year and a half earlier, then it gets watered down and hits the radio every where else(See snap music and every other southern genre for the past 10 yrs). Trust, I’ve been dj’ing and going to college parties in the south for the past four years.

    Also check good dancehall reggae spots. Black people get down there. Go to baltimore and check the real b more club scene. Not that copy cat white boy stuff comin from NY or wherever it is.

    White people still can’t beat black people when it comes to dancing. Period.

  • Tarik

    Blacks in south still do. To dance is not ‘thug’ enough or it is not keeping it real no more.

  • Cam

    I agree that dancinge doesn’t equate to being hard. There’s a ton of rappers that brag about how they don’t dance. Somebody should tell these dudes that if you’re not gonna make music for people to mindlessly dance away to, then they shouldn’t make music that’s mindless period. If i’m not gonna dance, I still wanna listen. But there’s not much to really listen to.

    That’s one thing that’s kind of stupid about a lot of hip hop you hear in clubs. People will stop dancing, and get into a song’s, but there’s not much to the lyrics. Like when dipset comes on at a club. Or when I’m So Hood comes on. People stop dancing and rap along like there’s really something in the song. They ain’t saying shit. At least when kanye’s good life comes on, people stop dancing but there’s not too much bullshit in the lyrics.

  • Stone

    well, I DC’s defense there were some dope “alternative Black” events or whatever you call it. Check Pookie’s Gallery, Uncle Q’s Living Room, Just Bcus, etc but they seem to come and go with the quickness. But at least there are people tryin’

    As for Black people not into dance music anymore, its a generational thing. When was the last dance/house hit? 1992? Most people from that era are married with kids living in the suburbs by now.

  • Jerome

    Good lookin on the responses fellas.

    It seems as if the “dance music” comment was the one most heavily commented on so I’ll give my opinion on that now.

    When I stated “dance music” I was referring to club/dance/house/techno. I consider Justics “D.A.N.C.E.” a hit, and thats what 2007? Stardusts “Music Sounds Better With You”?
    As far as black people “not feeling that stuff” I think thats a gross generalization, especially being that there are tons of black artists who are involved in these areas (Spankrock, Kid Sister, Pase Rock, etc.) that are enjoying success at this point in time.

    I SPIN reggae/hip hop/club whatever else for diverse crowds all over the city and it seems that the close mindedness over what people will dance to is baffling. Maybe its just D.C. because I’ve been to gutter spots in Baltimore (I used to be up there once a week to party, but can’t now cuz I’ll be spinning here) and they play house music along with club and people dance and really enjoy it.

    Good discourse here, lets keep it going.

  • Cam

    Jerome, you’re right. I did make a generalization about black people. I should have started out with ,”generally speaking…” because in general the majority of black folks don’t get into techno. Just look around at those parties

    You’re also right about the black artists involved in those areas. They’re pushing it into different areas, and I even think they don’t get the acclaim they maay deserve because they’re in a white dominated genre, especially those involved with bmore house or have those bmore influences. That stuff and its originators don’t get the credit they deserve aside from some music writers, the internet, and of course that people that are from bmore or who grew up with it.

    I’m baffled too by how people won’t dance to stuff they haven’t really heard before. It’s like they kind of stop and look around when something new comes on. Then 2 months later after it’s been on the radio, it’s their jam.

    As for the best way to spread the word on cool shit. Nothing beats word of mouth. However, there are certain factors that make something spread like wildfire or just fizzle out. Word has to be spread by the right people under the right conditions. That’s why a successful promoter can’t just be anybody. Or a successful marketer can’t just be anybody.

    By the way, I stopped by Napolean last weekend. Was it a private party? The dudes at the door let me in, but this other guy downstairs with the wristbands told me and my homegirl it was private. Is that joint weekly? I have to get on a list?

  • Rome


    All good, its good to have discourse and discussion about all things music related.

    As far as Napoleon, the first 2 hours of last weeks party were some private mess. This week is our Halloween party so come through and say whats up. I won’t be dressed but come up to the booth and holla.

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